Pioneer SX-750

 

 

pioneer-sx-750-front

 

Here's another of the classic Pioneer receivers. The Pioneer SX-750 was an upper mid range receiver  with a perfect complement of features and performance for someone wanting good performance while, at the same time, not breaking the bank. The SX-750 did just that while putting out 50 watts per channel at 0.1% total harmonic distortion. Manufactured during the heyday of silver faced receiver's this particular model was introduced in 1976 and made through 1977. It had a retail price tag of around $400.

 

pioneer-sx-750-left

 

One interesting feature of the SX-750, and Pioneer SX-650 for that matter, is that the input/output terminals and circuits for the pre amp and tuner section are laid out on one large circuit board. According to Pioneer this allowed the use of unshielded input cables and also resulted in better overall tonal quality.  Interestingly the performance of the SX-750 is not that far off from the flagship Pioneer SX-1250 with the exception of power output. So, not a bad value for $400 at the time.

 

pioneer-sx-750-right

 

The FM section utilizes a dual gate MOS type FET and a 4 gang variable capacitor for tuning. As you can also see the SX-750 has the standard styling of the time with silver faceplate, wood case and amber lighting.

 

pioneer-sx-750-lit

 

Here are a few of its other features:

  • Two tape in/outputs
  • Duplicate switch
  • Phono input
  • Aux/mic inputs
  • Tone and high filter switches
  • FM muting
  • Tuning and signal meters
  • Two separate bass and treble controls
  • Dimensions - 19 x 6 x 14.5
  • Weight - 31.25 lbs

 

Pioneer SX-750

 

The back of the SX-750 is interesting as it has a protruding base on which the input and output connectors as well as the speaker outputs are located.  The Pioneer SX-450, 550, and 650 also have this feature. It does make the units a little cumbersome to move.

 

Pioneer SX-750 Brochure

 

The Pioneer SX-750 is a popular receiver given it is fairly reasonably priced and has the iconic name and look of a 1970's silver faced receiver. For a really nice restored SX-750 you can expect to pay over $300 an up. For a serviced version in good condition around $200. Of course just a working unit in decent shape will be much less and can be had for $100 to $150.

 

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Here's a video of a restored SX-750 you might find interesting. There's actually a series of videos detailing this restoration as well.

 

4 thoughts on “Pioneer SX-750

  1. Can anyone get me started in the right direction on precautions to take on starting a SX-750 for the first time in 10+ years? I just picked one up and was hoping someone could help. Thanks for your time.

  2. I usually remove the case and clean the potentiometers before anything else. Although I would check to see if it powers up first. No use spending hours cleaning everything if it won’t even power up. I have an SX-950 and a few of the pots are hard to get to. Not sure about the SX-750 but I would try to clean them anyway. Some people like to blow them out with compressed air while some feel that it just blows dust into places it shouldn’t be. I usually blow them out and haven’t had a problem (yet). I have a pair of junk speakers that I hook up to receivers I want to test. You don’t want to blow out your good speakers if somethings wrong. Make sure the volume knob is at it lowest. Sometimes it’s at max which can be bad for a speaker when you turn it on – and your heart. Then I plug it in, turn it on and watch for any problems (smoke, excessive heat etc.). Good luck.

  3. Hi
    I have one of these receivers matched to a pair of Celestion UL10 speakers. I bought the 750 nearly forty years ago, but it is now giving a low hum and some of the wood effect is starting to peel off. Its still a damn good receiver, but I am now looking for an amp with the same spec and tone that will drive the UL10’s. Does anyone know of such an amp, preferably a vintage one, Pioneer or otherwise? Failing that, what spec do I need to look for?

  4. The humming noise is because the Capacitor needs to be replaced after 25years they get old and stop working.

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