Yamaha CR-400

Yamaha CR-400 Faceplate

No, the Yamaha CR-400 receiver isn’t big. It isn’t powerful. It doesn’t have a lot of features and it’s not sought after by collectors. But, what it is, is a well built little receiver that will perform perfectly in a smaller room. Besides, the more features there are the more that can go wrong with it right? At $330 it was Yamaha’s entry level offering which, at the time, included the CR-600, CR-800 and CR-1000.

Yamaha CR-400 Wood Case

The CR-400 was introduced in 1975 and is rated at 16 watts per channel so it isn’t going to blow the doors off your room. It may be the lowest power output of all the vintage Yamaha receivers. Even the later CR-240 put out 20 watts per channel.  It’s also not going to stress your audio rack because it weighs in at a paltry 21 pounds. But, by today’s standards I guess that’s pretty heavy.

Interestingly, there is no separate Balance control. Instead Yamaha implemented separate dual-concentric Volume controls for each channel. The volume knob has two sections, the inner for the left channel, and the outer for the right channel.

Yamaha CR-400 Dials

The CR-400 has a Microphone input with its own separate Volume control. This allows for  mic mixing, which lets you play any signal source, then blend in your voice and even record the results.

Yamaha CR-400 Knobs

It has inputs for Phone, Aux and Tape so you can run a iPod through it utilizing the Aux input with the correct adapter (3.5mm to 2 Male RCA Y connector) which runs about 5 bucks on eBay. It also features:

  • Dual FET FM Front End
  • IC and Ceramic Filter FM IF Amplifier
  • IC Multiplex Demodulator
  • Dual Tuning Meters
  • LED Indicators (Power/ FM Stereo)
  • 3-Stage DC Phono Equalizer
  • Mic Mixing
  • DC OCL Pure Complementary Power Amplifier
  • Subsonic Filter
  • Speaker Selection (A, B, A+B)
Yamaha CR-400 Inputs

Overall the Yamaha CR-400 is just a simple little stereo that will do its job well in a smaller space such as an office or a den. It’s easy to repair and has no unobtainable parts. It does have that flat / neutral Yamaha Natural Sound that some people really like and others really hate. The CR-400 was one of Yamaha’s first widely distributed receivers in the U.S. market.

As a collector’s item it’s not that desirable mainly because of its lack of power and features. You can pick up a really nice one fairly cheaply.

Available on Ebay

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5 thoughts on “Yamaha CR-400

  1. Hi.
    I have a cr 400 and I need a function switch, or the directions to repair this one. I have to put it gingerly between two functions to get both speakers to work.
    Thanks

  2. Hi
    I have a cr400 and is very happy , come visit me and i show you how this “little” blows my doors off !!
    If it had a remote this baby would be perfect and will never consider an upgrade

  3. Thank you for the hard work putting this site together. I refer to it often and appreciate all the specs, insights, opinions and interesting historic information.

    Just bought a CR-400 this morning at a local thrift store for $26. It never made it to to the sales shelf from the stocking cart when I grabbed it. Other than being dirty and dusty and a little scratchy in the pots, it seems to work fine with no damage to the faceplate or cabinet. I’ve wanted to add a Yamaha to my collection.
    After reading your site data and comments this will be a perfect fit. I’m very excited to get this little guy cleaned up and performing again.

    Thanks again,

    Jed

  4. Just purchased a mint condition CR400 with all original booklets alongside an AKAI AP-B20 turntable and delighted with both, was wary of the 16 watts a channel but it fills my bedroom with fantastically balanced sound.

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