NAD 7140

 

NAD 7140

 

The mid to late 1980's saw a transition toward cheaper less robust audio components mostly made of plastic. During that transition there were some interesting receivers made by companies such as NAD. This NAD 7140 receiver is a good example. Produced from 1987 through late 1989 is is a high quality stereo that moved away from the shiny brushed aluminum faceplates and beveled knobs so popular in the 1970's and very early 1980's. It retailed for $478.00.

 

NAD 7140 Display

 

The build quality and circuit design is excellent and, best of all, it can accommodate tape, phono and CD. The phono input can be switched from MM to MC as well.  The rating of 80 watts per channel is conservative and NAD's amp circuit is designed with a lot of headroom. There is a switch on the back to adjust for speaker impedance and the 7140 will provide 40 watts per channel at 2, 4, and 8 ohms.

NAD also utilizes what they call Soft Clipping. It is also controlled by a switch on the back panel. Soft Clipping limits the waveform when the amplifier is driven beyond its capacity thereby reducing harshness and distortion at high volume levels.

 

NAD 7140 Power

 

The Bass EQ button provides a 6dB boost at 32Hz for speakers lacking that extra punch. NAD explains their Infrasonic Filtering control as follows:

Infrasonic filtering is included to eliminate signal contamination from turntable rumble, record warps, tonearm/stylus resonances, vibration and acoustic feedback. This guarantees the cleanest possible handling of signals within the audible range and eliminates the excessive woofer-cone excursions that can cause inter modulation distortion and muddy bass in systems with-out filtering.

The IF can be turned off via the Infra Defeat button on the front panel.

 

NAD 7140 Inputs

 

The NAD 7140 entered the market at the beginning of the Compact Disc era and was designed with the CD in mind. Its 102 dB signal to noise ratio and 3 dB of IHF Dynamic Headroom allow undistorted reproduction of transient bursts from CD's or digitally recorded sources.

The 7140's FM tuner is fantastic and the AM tuner isn't bad either. Overall it's just a great receiver.

One stereo reviewer said:

The performance of the NAD 7140 is difficult to criticize. In fact, it is so outstanding, in so many respects, that there is a real danger of our lapsing into fulsome praise instead of offering genuine criticism. Let us say only that its FM tuner is one of the most sensitive we have had the pleasure of using-in a meaningful sense, such as its exceptional stereo 50-dB quieting sensitivity. The signal-to-noise ratio is also exceptional. The tuner's other characteristics are equally impressive, ranging from good to outstanding, and it had no weaknesses that we could discover. Even the AM section had an unusually wide and flat response.

The stereo measures 16 1/2 inches wide, 13 3/4 inches deep, and 4 inches high, and weighs in at just over 20 pounds.

 

NAD 7140 Parts

Overall the NAD 7140 is a great receiver. It is built well and can accommodate multiple input sources. If you want to run a CD player, a turntable and even a reel to reel and still have an AUX input open for an MP3 player then the NAD 7140 may be for you.  It has had some issues with the digital display failing but this can be fixed.

One of the nice aspects of the 7140 is that it isn't very expensive. Fully restored units sell for $200 while good working units sell for around $100-150.

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Yamaha CR-400

Yamaha CR-400 Faceplate

 

No, the Yamaha CR-400 receiver isn't big. It isn't powerful. It doesn't have a lot of features and it's not sought after by collectors. But, what it is, is a well built little receiver that will perform perfectly in a smaller room. Besides, the more features there are the more that can go wrong with it right? At $330 it was Yamaha's entry level offering which, at the time, included the CR-600, CR-800 and CR-1000.

 

Yamaha CR-400 Wood Case

 

The CR-400 was introduced in 1975 and is rated at 16 watts per channel so it isn't going to blow the doors off your room. It may be the lowest power output of all the vintage Yamaha receivers. Even the later CR-240 put out 20 watts per channel.  It's also not going to stress your audio rack because it weighs in at a paltry 21 pounds. But, by today's standards I guess that's pretty heavy.

Interestingly, there is no separate Balance control. Instead Yamaha implemented separate dual-concentric Volume controls for each channel. The volume knob has two sections, the inner for the left channel, and the outer for the right channel.

 

Yamaha CR-400 Dials

 

The CR-400 has a Microphone input with its own separate Volume control. This allows for  mic mixing, which lets you play any signal source, then blend in your voice and even record the results.

 

Yamaha CR-400 Knobs

 

It has inputs for Phone, Aux and Tape so you can run a iPod through it utilizing the Aux input with the correct adapter (3.5mm to 2 Male RCA Y connector) which runs about 5 bucks on eBay. It also features:

  • Dual FET FM Front End
  • IC and Ceramic Filter FM IF Amplifier
  • IC Multiplex Demodulator
  • Dual Tuning Meters
  • LED Indicators (Power/ FM Stereo)
  • 3-Stage DC Phono Equalizer
  • Mic Mixing
  • DC OCL Pure Complementary Power Amplifier
  • Subsonic Filter
  • Speaker Selection (A, B, A+B)

 

Yamaha CR-400 Inputs

 

Overall the Yamaha CR-400 is just a simple little stereo that will do its job well in a smaller space such as an office or a den. It's easy to repair and has no unobtainable parts. It does have that flat / neutral Yamaha Natural Sound that some people really like and others really hate. The CR-400 was one of Yamaha's first widely distributed receivers in the U.S. market.

As a collector's item it's not that desirable mainly because of its lack of power and features. You can pick up a really nice one for about $100. A good working one for around $60.

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